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U.S. FlagAugust 01, 2014
3:47 AM
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)  

General
   General Questions
      - What is a FAQ?
      - Where are the public boat ramps?
 
Administration
   Board of Elections
      - How do I find the County Court House?
 
Board of Chosen Freeholders
   Board of Freeholders
      - What is a Freeholder?
 
County Clerk
   Real Property - County Clerk's Office
      - Has the bank or lender canceled or discharged my mortgage of record?
      - How do I determine the age of my property?
 
County Park & Zoo
   Park and Zoo
      - How Do I Contact the Zoo?
      - How Do I Get to the Zoo?
      - How Many Animals Are There at the Zoo?
      - Is the Zoo Open?
 
Crest Haven Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
   Crest Haven Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
      - 1.What is included under Crest Haven Nursing & Rehabilitation Center's daily fees?
      - 2. Does Crest Haven accept Medicare, Medicaid, and other insurance plans?
      - 3. How will Crest Haven accommodate my specific dietary needs & preferences?
      - 4. How will I know if my loved one is getting good care and enough attention from the staff?
      - 5. What are your visiting hours?
 
Economic Resources & Capital Planning
   Economic Resources & Capital Planning
      - Does the County have any loan programs for businesses?
      - I need to find a location for my business... Where do I start?
      - I think I might need an environmental permit for my business... Can you help?
      - What do I need to do to start a business?
 
Fare Free Transportation
   Community Transportation
      - How do I use Fare-Free?
      - What is Fare-Free Transportation?
      - Who is eligible to ride Fare-Free?
 
Health Department
   Health Department
      - How do I get to the Health Department?
      - How can I protect myself from the flu?
      - How do you treat the flu?
      - How is the influenza virus passed around? How does flu spread?
      - How many people get sick or die from the flu every year?
      - Is it a cold or the flu?
      - What are antiviral medications?
      - What are complications of flu?
      - What are good health habits to prevent the flu?
      - What can I do to protect myself against the flu?
      - What is influenza (also called Flu)?
      - What is the stomach flu?
      - What should you do if you get the flu?
      - What type of flu season are we going to have this year?
      - When should I get vaccinated?
      - Where can I get more information about flu vaccinations?
      - Where else can I get a flu shot?
      - Who should get vaccinated?
      - Who should NOT get vaccinated?
      - Does New Jersey require that children be screened for lead poisoning?
      - How do I tell if there is lead paint on my house?
      - How does lead get into children?
      - How much lead is safe in a child? What amount of lead is considered lead poisoning?
      - Only poor children and children who live in cities get lead poisoning, right?
      - The biggest danger is paint chips, right?
      - What age are children most at risk for lead poisoning?
      - What are the effects of lead poisoning in children?
      - What are the symptoms of lead poisoning in children?
      - What can parents do to prevent their children from getting lead poisoning?
      - What children are at highest risk of lead poisoning?
      - What happens when a child has a blood lead of 20 ug/dL or more?
      - What if I am uninsured and can't afford to pay for the cost of the screening test for my child?
      - What should I do if I want to remove old paint from my house?
      - When should children be screened for lead poisoning?
      - Where is the lead in the environment?
      - Why is exposure to lead harmful to young children?
      - Will my health insurance pay for the cost of lead screening?
      - How do I find out if I have mold?
      - Is mold a health concern?
      - Should my home be tested for mold?
      - What are some of the health concerns about mold?
      - What is mold?
      - What should I do if mold is found?
      - Why is mold a problem?
      - What are the Health Effects Of Drinking Water Contaminants?
      - What Do I Do If My Drinking Water Exceeds An MCL Or Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) ?
      - What Is Pure Water?
      - What Water Tests Do I Need?
      - Does my insurance cover physical therapy?
      - What is required to receive physical therapy services?
 
Medical Examiner
   Inter-County Medical Examiner
      - Frequently Asked Questions
 
Planning Department
   Planning Department
      - Cape May County Population, Housing, Income, etc.
 
Public Information
   Communications Office
      - How do you find us?
      - How can I view the current Official Cape May County Directory online?
 
Public Works/County Engineer
   Public Works
      - How do I get to your office when coming from another area?
      - How much will it cost for a Road Opening Permit?
      - When is it necessary to obtain a County Road Opening Permit?
      - Who do I call for snow removal on a county road?
      - Who do I call for trash collection?
      - Who do I call to report a pothole that needs filling on a county road?
      - Who do I contact for brush and/or grass cutting on a county road?
      - Who do I contact to have a county road swept?
      - Who do I contact to remove a dead animal?
      - Who do I contact to report flooding on a county road?
      - Who do I contact when large vehicles vibrate my home because of utility digs?
 
Rutgers Cooperative Extension
   Rutgers Cooperative Extension
      - Where can I find a 4-H club and Youth Development programs?
      - Where can I get information on parenting, human development, food safety, nutrition and personal finance?
      - Where can I have a specific insect problem or plant disorder diagnosed?
      - Where can I obtain a soil test?
 
Sheriff's Office
   Sheriff's Office
      - Can I obtain a Department Patch?
      - What are the visiting hours for the Correctional Center?
      - What is the procedure for Employment with the Cape May County Sheriff's Office?
      - Who do I call to find out what a bail is for an inmate?
      - What is the address to send a letter to an inmate?
      - (Law Enforcement Only) Procedure for background checks.
      - How do I put money into an Inmate's Commissary account?
 
Superintendent of Schools
   Frequently Asked Questions About
      - Special Education
 
   General Questions
      - Teacher Certification, etc...
 
Surrogate
   Surrogate
      - Do all wills have to be probated?
      - Do my survivors have to pay inheritance tax?
      - Does the State of New Jersey take my assets if I die without a will?
      - How do I get started with an estate matter?
      - Is it expensive to probate a Will?
      - Must I engage an attorney to probate a Will?
      - My grandmother wrote her last wishes on an envelope before she died. Is this considered a Will?
      - What do I need to bring to the Surrogate Court to handle an estate?
      - What does "escheat" mean?
      - What happens if I do not have a Will?
      - Where should I keep my original Will?
 
Telephone Operations
   General Questions
      - Where can I get a list of county services and which department to contact?
 
Veterans' Bureau
   Veterans' Bureau
      - Where do I file for Veterans' NJ property tax deduction?
 
Youth Services
   Youth Services
      - How do I contact you?
 


General To Top
    General Questions
          What is a FAQ?


FAQ's are answers to Frequently Asked Question. We have tried to anticipate the most commonly asked questions you may have and provided answers for you here.


          Where are the public boat ramps?
 
Boat Ramp Information


Boater's Guide to Cape May County 2006-2007 PDF

NJ Tide Information


 
Administration To Top
    Board of Elections
          How do I find the County Court House?

The County Court House is located at 9 North Main Street (Route 9) in Cape May Court House, NJ.  From the Garden State Parkway traveling south turn right at the traffic light (milepost 10 / exit 10) then left at the next light. Approximately 1/4 mile on the right hand side.



 
Board of Chosen Freeholders To Top
    Board of Freeholders
          What is a Freeholder?
A freeholder is the elected county government representative in New Jersey who serves on the county's main governing body, the Board of Chosen Freeholders.  The term "Freeholder" came from ancient England where a man had to own property to be a holder of free land.  The colonists "chose" a "Freeholder" in each town to represent them in the Assembly and to conduct the daily business of the county.

The Cape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature in 1798.

Click here for the "Cape May County Government" brochure which answers the question: "What Is A Freeholder?". 


 
County Clerk To Top
    Real Property - County Clerk's Office
          Has the bank or lender canceled or discharged my mortgage of record?

HAS YOUR MORTGAGE LOAN BEEN RELEASED FROM RECORD?

By Rita Marie Fulginiti, County Clerk, 609-465-1018  coclerk@co.cape-may.nj.us

 

There is a common misconception among some property owners that the County Clerk’s Office will send out the property deed once their mortgage is paid in full.  I often receive telephone calls and personal visits in this regard from citizens.  I welcome these inquiries because it gives us the opportunity to check our records and make sure that the lender of record has properly discharged or canceled their mortgage in the public record.

The staff of the County Clerk’s Record Room and Archives is proficient in assisting our customers to research property information.  We are at your service to assist you in checking the status of a mortgage on record to determine whether it is open, continuing as a lien on the property, or discharged / canceled of record.  It is important for property owners to check this status after their mortgage loan has been paid in full to ensure that the process is completed.  Please be aware that the lien remains on the property until the discharge of mortgage or cancellation of mortgage is processed with the County Clerk’s Office.  Many property owners don’t discover that their paid in full mortgage is still open until an event such as a refinance or sale is pending and a title search, performed by a title searching firm, is done.  Obtaining a discharge of mortgage takes time and can postpone a refinance or settlement.  I have had the opportunity to assist property owners obtain their mortgage discharges many years after their loans were paid in full.  This task becomes increasingly more difficult when lenders who are individuals pass away or institutional lenders merge or go out of business.

Most real estate settlements involving the transfer of Cape May County property take place at a title insurance company or attorney’s office.   Documents executed at these settlements, including deeds and purchase money mortgages, are presented to the County Clerk’s Office for recording by the title insurance company or attorney.  After the recording process is complete we return the original documents bearing the recording stamps to the party who presented them for recording.  Title companies will forward the original deed to the property owner at the time the title insurance owner’s policy is sent, usually within 10 weeks after settlement.  Attorneys will likewise forward the deed to the property owner, or retain it in their files, if so directed.

The recording of the real property transaction in the public record is paramount.  The records of the County Clerk’s Office are accessible to any party requesting information.  Notice of all property transfers is provided to the municipal tax assessor and County Board of Taxation.  Property owners can rest assured that proof of their property ownership is obtained through the public records maintained by the County Clerk’s Office.  Security copies are backed up off site electronically and on microfilm.  Copies of the documents are readily available from our office.

The County Clerk’s Office is open to the public Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  Visit us in person, contact us by telephone at 465-1023 or email us at coclerk@co.cape-may.nj.us.



          How do I determine the age of my property?
Research in the deeds and tax records in the County Clerk's Office and Board of Taxation can help determine the age of a structure on a property.  This research can take time but the trained staff of the County Clerk's Office will assist you. 


 
County Park & Zoo To Top
    Park and Zoo
          How Do I Contact the Zoo?
You may contact the Cape May County Park and Zoo by:
 
    Calling: 609-465-5271
    Emailing:
bagens@co.cape-may.nj.us
    Faxing: 609-465-5421
    Mailing: 4Moore Road, DN 801
                 Cape May Court House, NJ 08210


          How Do I Get to the Zoo?

Going North:

~Turn Left at the Traffic Light at
Exit 11 on the Garden State Parkway
~Go 1/4 of a Mile, Straight Ahead at  the Route 9 Traffic
Light and into the Park and Zoo




Going South:

~Turn Right at the Traffic Light at
Exit 11 on the Garden State Parkway
~Go 1/4 of a Mile, Straight Ahead at  the Route 9 Traffic
Light and into the Park and Zoo



          How Many Animals Are There at the Zoo?
We have over 430 different individual animals which covers around 250 different species. Yes we have Lions and Tigers, but no Elephants or Gorillas.


          Is the Zoo Open?

The Zoo Hours: 10:00 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.

      (Summer hours we close at 4:45 P.M.)Summer Hours Change With DayLight Savings

      We are Open Everyday Except Christmas. We Will Close if There is Extremely Bad Weather Such as High Winds or Ice. 
  
Want to Know For Sure???

Call Us:

609-465-5271



 
Crest Haven Nursing & Rehabilitation Center To Top
    Crest Haven Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
          1.What is included under Crest Haven Nursing & Rehabilitation Center's daily fees?
Crest Haven Nursing & Rehabilitation Centers’ basic fees cover bedroom accommodations, all meals and snacks, 24-hour skilled nursing and certified nurse aide care, satellite television, laundry, all activities. Amenities such hair dresser can be provided at an additional low cost. Please call our Admissions Office at 609-465-1260 to discuss our fee schedule with your specific needs in mind.


          2. Does Crest Haven accept Medicare, Medicaid, and other insurance plans?
Crest Haven accepts Medicare, Medicaid and other options to cover the cost of room and board, contracted physician specialists, rehabilitative services and most medications.  Since the scope of Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance coverage is particular to each individual, it is best to discuss your specific benefits coverage with our Admissions Office directly. 


          3. How will Crest Haven accommodate my specific dietary needs & preferences?
Whenever possible, Crest Haven will make every attempt to accommodate personal dietary preferences so long as they are reasonable and can be handled in our kitchen.  Happily, our reputation for dining excellence precedes us and our varied menus satisfy our residents. Each diet is carefully selected according to the needs of each resident on arrival to the facility. The needs may change over time and will be adjusted accordingly. 


          4. How will I know if my loved one is getting good care and enough attention from the staff?
Crest Haven Nursing & Rehabilitation Center has an established a solid reputation for providing outstanding care and service.  We pride ourselves on maintaining a safe, clean, nurturing environment for all of our residents.  Moreover, our excellent Activities teams’ focus is to keep your loved one as involved, motivated and aware as possible. You are always welcome to speak with our nursing or social work team about your loved one’s needs directly. 


          5. What are your visiting hours?
Our open-door policy enables you to check on your loved one during normal visiting hours from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily.


 
Economic Resources & Capital Planning To Top
    Economic Resources & Capital Planning
          Does the County have any loan programs for businesses?
Cape May County does not provide loans to businesses, but works closely with a number of agencies who do!  Information on government-sponsored loan programs can be found at the following sites: 

US Small Business Administration
 
State of New Jersey
 
South Jersey Economic Development District

Before you pursue financing mechanisms, be certain that your business is in order!  Utilize the FREE counseling services of the Atlantic-Cape May Small Business Development Center to create and/or update your business plan to be certain that you are pursuing the financing that is right for you and your business. 

The County does have a Revolving Loan Program for the Commercial Fishing Industry.  For information on this program, contact Virginia Gandy at (609) 463-6415.


          I need to find a location for my business... Where do I start?
Call the Office of Economic Resources & Capital Planning.  We will provide you with contacts at your local planning and zoning offices to determine what you will need to do to get your business up and running!  If you are considering constructing a new facility, be sure to contact the Cape May County Planning Department to obtain information on soils, wetlands, and flood zone information, too!


          I think I might need an environmental permit for my business... Can you help?
Yes!  Environmental permits from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection are often required if you're constructing a new facility, adding onto your existing facility, or are operating certain types of equipment.  The New Jersey Small Business Environmental Assistance Program can help (and it's free!)!!!  Contact the Small Business Environmental Ombudsman for help in figuring out what permits you need and how to go about getting them!  Contact Joe Constance, Small Business Ombudsman, at (609) 777-0885 or via the NJ Commerce website.


          What do I need to do to start a business?
There are a number of things that you will need in order to start a successful business.  Follow the links below to get started.
    The Atlantic - Cape May Small Business Development Center - This organization, located in Mays Landing, provides professional FREE business counseling that can help you every step of the way.  From writing a business plan... to registering your business... to seeking financial assistance, the SBDC is the first place you should look when considering starting a business.
     The Cape May County Clerk's Office, located in downtown Cape May Court House, is the location to register your business trade name.  Follow the link to get more details.
     Check the Office of Economic Resources & Capital Planning's schedule of FREE Business Workshops for a course that can help you make the right decisions for your business.


 
Fare Free Transportation To Top
    Community Transportation
          How do I use Fare-Free?
Riders must have an Identification Card to use the Fare-Free vehicles.  Please call the office at 889-3700.  A call-taker will ask you the necessary information and assign you a Ridership ID number (your card will be mailed to you).  Please have this number handy every time you call Fare-Free to make an appointment.


          What is Fare-Free Transportation?
The Cape May County Fare-Free Transportation Program provides daily modified fixed-route, subscription, and demand-responsive bus transportation.


          Who is eligible to ride Fare-Free?
Cape May County provides free transportation to senior citizens, disabled residents, veterans, individuals of low-income and general residents of Cape May County.


 
Health Department To Top
    Health Department
          How do I get to the Health Department?
Directions: Take Garden State Parkway Exit 11 to Crest Haven Road. Head East on Crest Haven Road.  Make the second left off of Crest Haven Road, follow 2/10 of a mile and turn left at the brown sign marked “Health Department Parking" for entrance into the parking lot. Handicapped parking and easy access available.


          How can I protect myself from the flu?

The single best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu vaccination each fall. There are two types of vaccines:

  • The "flu shot" – an inactivated vaccine (containing killed virus) that is given with a needle. The flu shot is approved for use in people older than 6 months, including healthy people and people with chronic medical conditions.
  • The nasal-spray flu vaccine – a vaccine made with live, weakened flu viruses that do not cause the flu (sometimes called LAIV for “Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine”). LAIV is approved for use in healthy people 5 years to 49 years of age who are not pregnant.  

About two weeks after vaccination, antibodies develop that protect against influenza virus infection. Flu vaccines will not protect against influenza-like illnesses caused by other viruses.


People not in a high-risk group can still protect themselves from the flu.  Following respiratory etiquette can stop the spread of germs and help protect you from getting sick.

  • Cover your nose and mouth when you sneeze, use a tissue and throw it away immediately. 
  • Clean your hands frequently with soap and water (wash for 20 seconds).  Air dry or use paper towel in public places.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Keep your distance from others if you are sick.
  • If you are ill, stay home.


          How do you treat the flu?

Influenza is a virus and cannot be treated with antibiotics. Four antiviral drugs (amantadine, rimantadine, zanamavir and oseltamivir) have been approved for treatment of the flu. These medications must be prescribed by a doctor. Antiviral treatment lasts for 5 days and must be started within the first 2 days of illness.



          How is the influenza virus passed around? How does flu spread?

Flu viruses spread in respiratory droplets caused by coughing and sneezing. They usually spread from person to person, though sometimes people become infected by touching something with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 days after becoming sick. That means that you can pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick.

 

A person can spread the flu starting one day before he or she feels sick. Adults can continue to pass the flu virus to others for another three to seven days after symptoms start. Children can pass the virus for longer than seven days. Symptoms start one to four days after the virus enters the body. Some persons can be infected with the flu virus but have no symptoms. During this time, those persons can still spread the virus to others.


          How many people get sick or die from the flu every year?

Each flu season is unique, but it is estimated that approximately 10% to 20% of U.S. residents get the flu, and an average of 114,000 persons are hospitalized for flu-related complications. About 36,000 Americans die on average per year from the complications of flu.



          Is it a cold or the flu?

Influenza and a cold are both respiratory (breathing) system infections caused by viruses. Initial symptoms of flu and colds are similar, and it can sometimes be difficult to tell if you have the flu or a very bad cold. The flu can cause more serious illness than a common cold. Colds and flu are both highly contagious and, in the initial stages, a bad cold and a mild case of the flu might seem alike. However, flu is a serious illness that can have life-threatening complications, including pneumonia and encephalitis. It is impossible to tell for sure if you have the flu based on symptoms alone. Doctors can perform tests to see if you have the flu within 2-3 days of the start of illness. Check this table for a comparison of the symptoms for each illness.

Symptoms

Cold

Flu

Fever

rare in adults and older children, but can be as high as 102° F in infants and small children

usually 102° F, but can go up to 104° F and usually lasts 3 to 4 days

Headache

Rare

sudden onset and can be severe

Muscle aches

Mild

usual, and often severe

Tiredness & Weakness

Mild

often extreme, and can last two or more weeks

Extreme exhaustion

Never

sudden onset and can be severe

Runny nose

Often

sometimes

Sneezing

Often

sometimes

Sore throat

Often

sometimes

Cough

mild hacking cough

usual, and can become severe



          What are antiviral medications?

Three antiviral drugs (amantadine, rimantadine, and oseltamivir) are approved for use in preventing the flu. These are prescription medications, and a doctor should be consulted before they are used. Antiviral treatment lasts for 5 days and must be started within the first 2 days of illness.



          What are complications of flu?
Complications of flu can include bacterial pneumonia, dehydration, and worsening of chronic medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, asthma, or diabetes. Children may get sinus problems and ear infections.


          What are good health habits to prevent the flu?

Apart from vaccination, good health habits and antiviral medications are other measures that can help protect against the flu.

 

  • Avoid close contact.
    Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
    If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. You will help prevent others from catching your illness.
  • Cover your mouth and nose.
    Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.
  • Clean your hands.
    Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.


          What can I do to protect myself against the flu?

Certain people are at increased risk for serious complications from the flu. This group includes people age 65 years and older and people of any age with chronic medical conditions. Pregnant women and children between 6 months and 23 months of age also are at increased risk from flu complications. By far, the single best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu shot. You can also decrease your chances of getting sick by frequently washing your hands and avoiding touching your nose, eyes, and mouth, and avoiding crowded places. Three antiviral drugs (amantadine, rimantadine, and oseltamivir) are approved and commercially available for use in preventing flu. All of these medications are prescription drugs, and a doctor should be consulted before the drugs are used for preventing the flu.

 

Year-round, you can help stop the spread of germs by practicing “respiratory etiquette” — good health manners — by covering your nose and mouth every time you sneeze, cough or blow your nose, putting used tissues in the trash, and washing your hands well and often whenever you or someone you are close to is sick. Clinics and hospitals may also give you a facemask to wear in waiting areas and exam rooms if you have a fever and cough or rash, so be prepared!  There are also ways you can keep from catching someone else’s germs.  These include not sharing things like cigarettes, towels, lipstick, toys, or anything else that might be contaminated with respiratory germs.  You also should not share food, utensils or beverage containers with others.



          What is influenza (also called Flu)?

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent this illness is by getting a flu vaccination each fall.

Every year in the United States, on average:

  • 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu;
  • more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and;
  • about 36,000 people die from flu.

Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.



          What is the stomach flu?
Many people use the term "stomach flu” to describe illnesses with nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. These symptoms can be caused by many different viruses, bacteria, or even parasites. While vomiting, diarrhea, and being nauseous or “sick to your stomach” can sometimes be related to the flu — particularly in children — these problems are rarely the main symptoms of influenza. The flu is a respiratory disease and not a stomach or intestinal disease.


          What should you do if you get the flu?
Stay home! Rest, drink plenty of liquids, avoid using alcohol and tobacco, and take medication to relieve the symptoms of flu. Never give aspirin to children or teenagers who have flu-like symptoms – and particularly fever – without first speaking to your doctor. Giving aspirin to children and teenagers who have influenza can cause a rare but serious illness called Reye syndrome. If, however, flu symptoms are unusually severe (for example, trouble breathing), you should consult your health-care provider right away. If you are at special risk from complications of flu, you should consult your health-care provider when your flu symptoms begin. This includes people 65 years or older, people with chronic medical conditions, pregnant women, or children. Your doctor may choose to use certain antiviral drugs to treat the flu.


          What type of flu season are we going to have this year?

It is not possible to accurately predict in advance what type of flu season we are going to have. Historically, A (H3N2) viruses have been associated with more-severe flu seasons during which higher numbers of influenza-related hospitalizations and deaths have occurred.



          When should I get vaccinated?

October or November is the best time to get vaccinated, but getting vaccinated in December or even later can still be beneficial. Flu season can begin as early as October and last as late as May.



          Where can I get more information about flu vaccinations?

We will be posting information, as it becomes available, on the County’s Department of Health website at www.cmchealth.net. You may also call the Cape May County flu hotline at 463-6581. Additionally, the NJ State Department of Health and Senior Services has a flu hotline, at 1-866-234-0964.


Additional information about influenza can be found at the CDC website: www.cdc.gov/flu or at the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services website: www.state.nj.us/health/flu.




          Where else can I get a flu shot?

Information on Cape May County’s free flu vaccination programs is posted on the County’s Department of Health website at www.cmchealth.net under “Flu Information” and Seasonal Flu. You may also call the Cape May County flu hotline at 463-6581. Additionally, the NJ State Department of Health and Senior Services has a flu hotline, at 1-866-234-0964.

 

Apart from the County’s flu vaccination program, flu shots are also available from physicians and at many private locations located throughout Cape May County. Please contact the locations below to verify availability and any cost for the flu shot. To find a flu shot offered at other locations throughout New Jersey, click on www.findaflushot.com

To find other flu clinics organized by local health departments in other areas of the state, click on http://www.state.nj.us/health/flu/schedules.shtml.



          Who should get vaccinated?

In general, anyone who wants to reduce their chances of getting the flu can get vaccinated. However, certain people should get vaccinated each year either because they are at high risk of having serious flu-related complications or because they live with or care for high risk persons. People who should get vaccinated each year are:

 

People at high risk for complications from the flu:

  • Children aged 6-59 months of age,
  • Pregnant women,
  • People 50 years of age and older,
  • People who live in nursing homes or other long-term care facilities, and
  • People with certain chronic medical conditions, including:
    • heart disease; lung disease; asthma; kidney disease; metabolic disease, such as diabetes; anemia and other blood disorders; muscle or nerve disorders; weakened immune system (resulting from medication, cancer treatment or infection with HIV/AIDS); and children 6 months to 18 years of age who are on long-term aspirin therapy.

People who live with or care for those at high risk for complications from the flu:

  • Household contacts of persons at high risk for complications from the flu (see above),
  • Household and out of home caregivers of children less than 6 months of age (these children are too young to be vaccinated), and
  • Healthcare workers.

Anyone who wants to decrease their risk of influenza.



          Who should NOT get vaccinated?

Some people should not be vaccinated without first consulting a physician. They include:

  • People who have a severe allergy to chicken eggs.
  • People who have had a severe reaction to an influenza vaccination in the past.
  • People who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) within 6 weeks of getting an influenza vaccine previously.
  • Children less than 6 months of age (influenza vaccine is not approved for use in this age group).
  • People who have a moderate or severe illness with a fever should wait to get vaccinated until their symptoms lessen.

If you have questions about whether you should get a flu vaccine, consult your health-care provider.



          Does New Jersey require that children be screened for lead poisoning?
New Jersey State law (Public Law 1995, chapter 328) requires every physician, nurse practitioner, and health care facility to screen all children under six years of age who come to them for care. Parents have the right to refuse to have the test done for any reason. There is no requirement that children be screened for lead poisoning before they can go to school or day care.


          How do I tell if there is lead paint on my house?

You can pretty much assume that any house built before 1960 has some lead paint on it, unless you know that all the old paint was removed some time in the past. If you want to be certain, you can hire a state-certified Lead Evaluation Contractor. New Jersey law requires that any person who does inspections for lead paint must meet certain training and experience requirements, pass a test, and obtain a permit from the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services. The inspector should be able to show you his/her permit, which looks like a photo ID. In addition, any company in the business of doing lead inspections must be certified by the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (NJDCA). For more information, or a list of state-certified lead evaluation contractors, call the NJDCA at (609)530-8812.

There are also simple test kits that you can buy in a hardware store that you can use to test paint, water, or dishes for lead. Be aware however, that these tests, while reasonably accurate, do not always detect lead even when it is present. For example, if lead paint is covered with several layers of non-lead paint, the test kit may not show positive. You can also take paint chips or water samples and send them to a laboratory for testing. There are many environmental laboratories who perform this service. They are listed in the Yellow Pages under "Laboratories - Testing".


          How does lead get into children?

Young children can get lead by:

  • swallowing lead dust that is picked on their hands, or toys or other objects that they put into their mouths;
  • swallowing lead paint chips;
  • breathing lead dust in the air
  • eating food or drinking water that has lead in it.


          How much lead is safe in a child? What amount of lead is considered lead poisoning?
There is no single number above which a child has "lead poisoning" and below which is safe. So far as we know, no amount of lead in the human body is "safe" or "normal". Unlike other natural minerals, such as zinc and iron, that are necessary for our bodies to function properly, but are toxic in high doses, lead has no natural function in the human body. However, scientists have been able to detect problems in children only at lead levels above 10 micrograms per deciliter (ug/dL) in the blood. Blood lead levels between 10 and 19 are considered borderline, and the child retested every few months to insure that it does not go up. In New Jersey, any blood lead level of 20 or more is considered significant, and must be reported to the state health department. Levels above 45 are considered especially dangerous and need immediate attention of a doctor. A level of 70 or more is considered an emergency, requiring hospitalization.


          Only poor children and children who live in cities get lead poisoning, right?
No! While these children are at higher risk than other children, there is so much lead, in so many places, in the environment in New Jersey that all children in this state are at risk of lead poisoning. There have been cases of lead poisoning in children reported every year in every county in the state.


          The biggest danger is paint chips, right?
No! While lead paint chips can contain a lot of lead, and be very dangerous, most children with lead poisoning never eat paint chips! The most dangerous lead is the lead you can't see. Most lead poisoning in children is due to their swallowing or breathing particles of very fine household dust or soil that have been contaminated with lead. This fine dust is very easily absorbed once it gets into the body.


          What age are children most at risk for lead poisoning?

The children that we are most concerned about at children less than six years old, particularly children between six months old (when they start to crawl around) and their third birthday. This is because:

  • The time between birth and six years, and especially between birth and three years of age, is when the human brain grows the fastest, and when the critical connections in the brain and nervous system that control thought, learning, hearing, movement, behavior and emotions are formed. Anything that effects the brain at this time has life-long effects.
  • The normal behavior of children at this age - crawling, exploring, teething, putting objects in their mouth - puts them into contact with any lead is present in their environment.
Children at this age absorb more of the lead that gets into their lungs or stomach than adults or older children.


          What are the effects of lead poisoning in children?
Very high levels of lead can cause seizures, severe brain damage resulting in mental retardation, coma, and even death. Lower levels can cause stomach pains and anemia. Long term exposure to lead, even at relatively low levels, have been found to be associated with decreased hearing, lower intelligence, hyperactivity, attention deficits, and problems in school.


          What are the symptoms of lead poisoning in children?
Children with high levels of lead in their body may not have symptoms! Lead poisoning causes symptoms only have very high levels, and even then those symptoms - stomach aches, anemia - are similar to those of much less serious illnesses. Only when a child is very sick will they get serious symptoms, such as seizures. Such children should be taken to a hospital immediately! However, because most children with lead poisoning will not show obvious symptoms, it is important that children be screened to detect lead poisoning.


          What can parents do to prevent their children from getting lead poisoning?

There are a lot of simple, low-cost things that parents can do to keep children from being exposed to lead, like:

  • Have them wash their hands frequently, especially before eating or after playing outside or on the floor.
  • Wash toys and other objects they handle and put in their mouths.
  • Take off shoes and leave them at the door.
  • Give them a nutritious diet high in iron and calcium and low in fat. Iron and calcium block lead from getting into red blood cells and being carried around the body.
  • Clean floors and window sills by using a mop or sponge and detergent. Sweeping, dusting, and vacuuming only push lead dust around, and don't remove it. Recent research shows special detergents are not needed.
  • If they work in a job that uses lead, shower and change clothes before leaving work. Wash work clothes separately from the other family laundry.
  • Keep children away from hobbies that use lead. Keep children out of the workshop, or clean-up carefully after using lead.
Don't remove paint unless they know it is does not have lead in it. Any paint known or suspected to have lead should be removed only with special precautions, or by a state-certified Lead Abatement Contractor.


          What children are at highest risk of lead poisoning?
  • Poor children
  • African-American children
  • Children who live in houses built before 1950
  • Children who live in houses with lead paint, where that paint is chipping or peeling, or has been removed without taking the proper precautions.


          What happens when a child has a blood lead of 20 ug/dL or more?
The laboratory that performs the test must report it to the Department of Health and Senior Services. The Department then alerts the local health department where the child lives. The local health department sends out a Public Health Nurse to inform the family about lead poisoning and to help it get the medical attention the child needs. It also sends an inspector to find out where the lead hazards are. The inspector will write a report to the property owner, telling him/her where the lead hazards are and what to do about them. The property owner is legally required to remove those hazards. If necessary, the local health department will take the property owner to court to force him/her to remove the hazards.


          What if I am uninsured and can't afford to pay for the cost of the screening test for my child?
Free screening is available through your local health department and the NJ Department of Health and Senior Services Laboratory. Every local health department in the state is required to provide well child services for its community, including lead screening and immunization. For the dates, times, and locations of your local Child Health Conference, call your local health department. If you are uncertain about which local health department covers your area, call the Child and Adolescent Health Program at (609) 292-5666.


          What should I do if I want to remove old paint from my house?
  • Assume that the paint is leaded unless you know for certain that it is not. See the answer above for how to get paint tested for lead.
  • Don't assume that every painter knows how to remove lead paint safely. State-certified Lead Abatement Contractors must meet requirements set by the NJ Department of Community Affairs (NJDCA) and follow work practices set by the NJDCA. Their workers must meet training requirements, pass a test, and have a permit issued by the NJ Department of Health and Senior Services. For a list of state-certified Lead Abatement Contractors, call the NJDCA at (609) 530-8812.
  • Don't remove the lead paint yourself unless you know how to do it safely. The basic principles of safe lead paint removal are:
    • DO wet the area first and manually scrape off the old paint.
    • DON'T dry scrape or sand off old paint.
    • DON'T use a power sander, power washer, or sand blasting.
    • DON'T burn paint off, or use a heat gun with a temperature of over 700 degrees. The fumes could give you lead poisoning!
    • DO cover the floor/ground and seal off the work area with plastic.
    • DON'T allow children, pets, or pregnant women in the work area.
    • DO clean up very carefully at the end of the work day or job.
The NJ Department of Health and Senior Services has a pamphlet, "Important Information for Homeowners and Renters about Lead Paint Hazards", that explains these precautions in more detail. For a copy, call the Child and Adolescent Health Program at (609) 292-5666.


          When should children be screened for lead poisoning?
All children should be screened for lead poisoning at 12 and 24 months of age. Any child older than 12 months, but less than 6 years old, who has never previously been screened should, also be screened. In addition, any child who is six months of age or older, and is exposed to a particular lead hazard, should be screened. For example, if the child lives in a house with peeling paint, or a older house that was recently renovated without precautions to control lead dust, should be screened as soon as possible.


          Where is the lead in the environment?

Lots of places!

  • Lead-based oil paint on buildings. Lead paint was banned in New Jersey in 1971, but not nationwide until 1978, so any house built before 1978 may contain lead paint. Any house built before 1950 may be a particular risk, since paint made before then had very high (up to 50%) levels of lead pigments. More than one-third of the houses in New Jersey were built before 1950. Every county has at least 10,000 pre-1950 housing units. In some cities, the majority of the housing was built before 1950.
  • In the soil, especially near factories that used lead, along heavily traveled roads (due to lead in gasoline), and on farms and orchards where lead arsenate pesticides were used. As New Jersey's population has grown, housing developments have been built on land that used to be factories, farms, or orchards where lead was used.
  • In the water, if the building has lead pipes, or lead solder connecting the pipes.
  • On the clothes of adults who work in industry that uses lead.
  • In common hobbies, such as stained glass, pottery making, or home manufacture of fishing sinkers or bullets.
On consumer products, such as pottery, toys, crayons, and vinyl mini-blinds imported from countries that do not ban the use of lead in these products. While these products are not supposed to be imported into the U.S., sometimes they are carried in by individuals who buy them in other countries, or are not detected in Customs and discovered only after they are in the hands of consumers.


          Why is exposure to lead harmful to young children?
Scientists have found that lead can disrupt the normal growth and development of a child's brain and central nervous system. If this exposure happens at a critical time in brain development, the damage can be permanent. Young children are also more likely to be harmed by exposure to lead because the normal behavior of children - crawling on the floor, playing in dirt, putting objects in their mouths - puts them into immediate contact with any lead that might be present in their environment.


          Will my health insurance pay for the cost of lead screening?
State law (Public Law 1995, Chapter 316) requires every health insurance plan covering a group of 50 or more persons, including HMO's and Managed Care, to cover the cost of lead screening and childhood immunizations, without any deductible.


          How do I find out if I have mold?
Identifying mold in your home should always begin with a thorough visual inspection. An inspection can be done by a homeowner or by a qualified environmental consultant.  The inspection may be focused on specific areas where moisture has been seen, where flooding or water damage has occurred or in common areas known for mold growth such as basements, attics and crawl spaces.  Stained or discolored areas of walls and ceilings that continue to increase in size or change colors can be signs of mold growth.  A pungent musty smell is also an indicator of mold growth. 


          Is mold a health concern?

Mold can be a health concern.  Unfortunately, it is not known how much mold is needed to cause health problems.  Also, there are no standards, regulations or guidelines to base a health determination or exposure. However, there are factors that can be used to assess whether an increased health risk may be present.  These include evaluating the individuals potentially exposed and the extent and conditions of the mold growth.

 

Some individuals who have pre-existing health conditions may be at an increased risk.  Individuals who have allergies or lung conditions such as asthma or emphysema can exhibit health effects from exposure. Very young infants and the elderly may also be at an increased risk.


          Should my home be tested for mold?

If a visual inspection reveals the presence of mold additional testing is not necessary.  The focus should be on correcting any moisture problems and cleaning up the mold contamination.  However, if mold is not found during a visual inspection and is still suspected of being present, additional testing may be necessary.


Testing for mold should always be performed by a qualified person. Your Local Health Department may be able to assist or an environmental consultant who specializes in or has experience in evaluating mold contamination should be contacted.


Additional testing may include an evaluation of the relative humidity in the home and taking moisture readings of building materials in suspected areas. Swab testing of suspected surfaces and bulk samples of building materials may also be performed. Specialized air testing is also an option for identifying mold spores or MVOC’s from mold growth.  However, these specialized air tests can be very expensive and need to be conducted in context with an overall assessment plan. Caution should be taken when considering air testing since there are no standards for determining an acceptable level of mold in the air.  Careful interpretation of air sampling results is also very important since individual susceptibility and health status varies. If air sampling is conducted, an outside reference sample should also be collected at the same time for comparison with the indoor samples.



          What are some of the health concerns about mold?

Molds emit spores and chemicals as part of their normal life cycle.  Individuals may exhibit reactions when exposed to these materials.

Spores emitted by molds are microscopic and once airborne can be inhaled easily.  Spores may contain allergens and can cause irritation in the nose, throat and respiratory tract.  Common allergic reactions include sneezing, nasal congestion, coughing, and skin rashes. Molds may also trigger asthma attacks in persons who are allergic.


In addition to allergens, molds may emit microbiological volatile organic compounds (MVOC’s). These chemicals usually have a strong and unpleasant odor and are associated with the musty smell that many individuals equate to mold being present. These chemicals are released into the air and when inhaled can also cause allergic reactions.  MVOC’s have also been linked to headaches, nausea, dizziness and fatigue.


Some molds may produce toxic substances called mycotoxins.  Mycotoxins can be inhaled, ingested or absorbed through the skin.  Mycotoxins are potent, toxic chemicals that can cause significant health problems.


Different molds may produce different mycotoxins and some molds may produce different mycotoxins depending on the surface on which they’re growing. Mycotoxins can affect the central nervous system, the immune system, the respiratory system and the digestive system.  Some molds may cause more sever reactions than other molds, so it’s important that mold be remediated.  For any severe exposures or health effects associated with a mold exposure, individuals should consult their physician.



          What is mold?

Molds are fungi and occur naturally in the environment.  Many different species of mold exist in New Jersey.  Molds can be found almost anywhere and can grow on just about any material as long as conditions are favorable.  For growth, molds need nutrients such as oxygen and moisture and a material to grow on.  Molds in the environment help break down dead materials and convert it back into organic matter to be used again by living organisms.  Molds grow by digesting and destroying the material they grow on.


Molds grow in colonies.  Visible mold growth may take on different forms and colors.  Some molds may appear circular in growth while others may grow and spread to cover an area.  Molds may appear brown or yellow in color or green and black.  The appearance will depend on the species of mold present.  Some common molds found indoors include species of Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Pennicillium and Alternaria.


Molds reproduce by making spores. These spores become airborne and circulate in the air, both outside and inside of buildings.  If spores land on a suitable material and conditions are favorable, the mold will begin to grow.



          What should I do if mold is found?

Corrective action and remediation steps need to be taken to address the mold conditions found.  Remediation is necessary to prevent further property damage and prevent further exposures.  Specific steps have been outlined by the USEPA to remediate mold contamination. These include identifying and correcting the source of moisture, removing and/or cleaning mold contaminated materials, removing the mold and ensuring the area is completely dry before performing any renovation or construction work.  The USEPA also notes that it is important not only to kill the mold but to also clean it up since even dead mold remains allergenic.  


Who performs this remediation work is not always clear. For small areas affected by mold growth (i.e., <10ft2), a homeowner or building maintenance staff for apartments and condominiums may be capable of performing the work.  Larger areas affected (i.e., >100ft2), should be performed by a qualified contractor who has experience in mold or environmental contamination clean up. Professional judgment should be used for affected areas that fall within these two dimensions.  Mold work can be hazardous, so regardless of who performs the work, work practices that protect the workers as well as the occupants need to be used.  Workers need to be protected with gloves, a respirator, protective clothing and goggles. Also, the work area may need to be contained to prevent the spread of mold to other areas.

Click here for a list of Mold Remediation Firms in New Jersey



          Why is mold a problem?

Molds become a problem when they grow inside of homes and buildings.  Many building materials such as drywall, ceiling tiles and wood framing contain cellulose. Cellulose is a basic component of wood and is an excellent material on which molds can grow.  As molds grow on building materials they become destructive.  Molds may grow unnoticed, above ceilings, behind walls, in attics and basement or in crawl spaces.  Molds can cause staining of walls and ceilings and can begin to break down the studs and joists of buildings causing extensive property damage.  

Excessive moisture is a key ingredient for molds to grow. Excessive moisture may be caused by plumbing leaks, leaking roofs or windows, high humidity in the building, flooding or condensation inside walls due to poor insulation. Molds are also a concern because of the health problems that they have been shown to cause.


          What are the Health Effects Of Drinking Water Contaminants?

Chemicals in drinking water which are toxic may cause either acute or chronic health effects. An acute effect usually follows a large dose of a chemical and occurs almost immediately. Examples of acute health effects are nausea, lung irritation, skin rash, vomiting, dizziness, and, in the extreme, death.


The levels of chemicals in drinking water, however, are seldom high enough to cause acute health effects. They are more likely to cause chronic health effects, effects that occur after exposure to small amounts of a chemical over a long period. Examples of chronic health effects include cancer, birth defects, organ damage, disorders of the nervous system, and damage to the immune system.


Evidence relating chronic human health effects to specific drinking water  contaminants is very limited. In the absence of exact scientific information, scientists predict the likely adverse effects of chemicals in drinking water using laboratory animal studies and, when available, human data from clinical reports and epidemiologi­cal studies.


The possible health effects of a contaminant in drinking water differ widely, depending on whether a person consumes the water over a long period, briefly, or intermittently. Thus, Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) and monitoring requirements for systems serving permanent populations (Public Community Water Systems and Nontransient Non­community Water Systems) may be more stringent than those regulations for systems serving transient or intermittent users (Public Noncommunity Water Systems).


Maximum contaminant levels are based, directly or indirectly, on an assumed drinking water rate of two liters per person per day. MCLs for organic and inorganic contaminants (except nitrate) are based on the potential health effects of long-term exposure, and they provide substantial protection to virtually all consumers. The uncertainty in this process is due in part to the variations in the knowledge of and the nature of the health risks of the various contaminants.


          What Do I Do If My Drinking Water Exceeds An MCL Or Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) ?

If an MCL Is Exceeded, Consult Your Health Department.

MCLs are health-based standards and you may be assuming additional risk if you continue to drink the water. Young children and infants are particularly susceptible.

SMCLs are aesthetic standards.

Always Retest To Ensure You Have A Problem.  -  It is always good practice to have your water retested to ensure accuracy in sampling and in the laboratory. The second test should be done by a different laboratory to confirm results.

Consult With A Water-Quality Expert And/Or Your Local Health Department. - When you are certain you have a particular contamination problem, consult with a water-quality expert. These individuals may be familiar with the preferred treatment methods in your area. Recent and historical water data should be reviewed by an expert to determine which processes are appro­priate. The local health official or DEP may also be consulted if uncertain­ties arise.



          What Is Pure Water?

Pure water means different things to different people. Homeowners are primarily concerned with domestic water problems related to color, odor, taste, and safety to family health, as well as the cost of soap, detergents, “softening,” or other treatments required for improving the water quality. Chemists and engineers working for industry are concerned with the purity of water as it relates to scale deposition and pipe corrosion. Regulatory agencies are concerned with setting standards to protect public health. Farmers are interested in the effects of irrigation waters on the chemical, physical, and osmotic properties of soils, particularly as they influence crop production; hence, they are concerned with the water’s total mineral content, proportion of sodium, or content of ions “toxic” to plant growth.


One means of establishing and assuring the purity and safety of water is to set a standard for various contaminants. A standard is a definite rule, principle, or mea­surement which is established by governmental authority. The fact that it has been established by authority makes a standard rigid, official, and legal; but this fact does not necessarily mean that the standard is fair or based on sound scientific knowledge. Where human health data or other scientific data are sparse, standards have some­times been established on an interim basis until better information becomes available.


The Safe Drinking Water Act sets minimum standards to be met by all public water systems.
New Jersey and most other states have established their own drinking water regulations using federal regulations as a basis. State regulations may be more stringent than the federal regulations


          What Water Tests Do I Need?

For Public Water Systems - Under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), all public water systems are required to sample and test their water supplies according to a fixed schedule for all contaminants for which MCLs have been set.

For New Wells (Nonpublic Water Systems)  - Under New Jersey regulations and under local authority, a sample of raw water from every proposed nonpublic water system must be tested for:

  • Bacteria (Total Coliform)
  • Nitrates
  • Iron
  • Manganese
  • PH

Additional testing may be required by the local board of health having jurisdic­tion. New Jersey regulations mention that local authorities may want to require testing for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and/or radon. The local board of health may also require additional treatment of the water.

For Existing Home Wells - When buying an existing home with a well, it is advisable and sometimes required that the seller conduct water testing before closing on the house. Many buyers have discovered water-quality problems too late and are burdened with the expense of having to treat their well water or drilling a completely new well. The Farmers Home Administra­tion, Veterans Administration, and Federal Housing Administration all require water testing on home wells before mortgages are issued. Some realtors are also requiring the seller to provide a certificate of water potability for their listings.   Recommended tests include bacteria and nitrates.



          Does my insurance cover physical therapy?

Most insurance is accepted including, but not limited to: Medicare, Blue Cross Blue Shield Traditional, Blue Cross and Blue Shield PPO, Amerihealth, Devon Health Care, QRS, Health Net, Intergroup Services Corporation, Auto Insurance and USHealthcare fee for service, and Auto Insurances. All plans and policies differ. You should call your insurer to find out your coverage plan including benefit period, visit limits, co-pays, deductibles, and whether a referral is necessary from your primary care physician. Questions on billing should be directed to Mrs. Taylor at 465-6849.

 

You may apply for financial assistance if you demonstrate appropriate need, and if you qualify your payment for physical therapy services will be adjusted according to your financial need.



          What is required to receive physical therapy services?
As of February 2003, New Jersey law allows consumers direct access to physical therapy services. You do not need a prescription from your doctor to begin physical therapy.


 
Medical Examiner To Top
    Inter-County Medical Examiner
          Frequently Asked Questions

 



 
Planning Department To Top
    Planning Department
          Cape May County Population, Housing, Income, etc.
Where can I find population, housing, income, and other information for Cape May County?

Answer:  See Data Book  or contact County Planning Dept.



 
Public Information To Top
    Communications Office
          How do you find us?


We are located in the Cape May County Administration Building located at 4 Moore Road, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210.  For directions please click on the following:


"How Do You Find Us" Page.


          How can I view the current Official Cape May County Directory online?


Cape May County Directory Pdf (4MB)


 
Public Works/County Engineer To Top
    Public Works
          How do I get to your office when coming from another area?

DIRECTIONS TO CAPE MAY COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
4 MOORE ROAD
CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE, NEW JERSEY  08210
(Office of The County Engineer, Public Works (609) 465-1035)

FROM THE NORTH (i.e. Atlantic City, Toms River, New Brunswick):
     Garden State Parkway South
     Left off of Garden State Parkway at Exit 11 (first traffic light) onto Crest Haven Road
     When through the intersection, make immediate left onto Moore Road (runs parallel to
     Garden State Parkway)
     County Administration Building is 4 Moore Road (one story brick building)
     Enter parking lot and make a left
     Building entrance is in front of flag pole (North end of lot)
 
FROM THE NORTHWEST (i.e. Cumberland County, Camden/Philadelphia):
     Route 55 South to end (Becomes two-lane Route 47)
     Follow Route 47 to Route 347 (Bear left and follow main traffic flow at split)
     Continue on 347; becomes Route 47 again approximately 8 miles
     Make left onto Route 83 South (use caution)
     Continue on Route 83 to Route 9 South
     Make a right onto Route 9 South
     Follow Route 9 South until traffic light at Crest Haven Road (County Park and Zoo on right)
     Make a left onto Crest Haven Road
     Follow Crest Haven Road through next light (Garden State Parkway)
     Once through parkway intersection, make an immediate left onto Moore Road (runs parallel to
     Garden State Parkway)
     County Administration Building is 4 Moore Road (one story brick building)
     Enter parking lot and make a left
     Building entrance is in front of flag pole (North end of lot)

FROM THE SOUTH:
     Garden State Parkway North to exit 11 (third right)
     Make a right at Exit 11 onto Crest Haven Road
     Make an immediate left onto Moor Road
     County Administration Building is 4 Moore Road (one story brick building)
     Enter parking lot and make a left
     Building entrance is in front of flag pole (North end of lot)
    

 



          How much will it cost for a Road Opening Permit?
Click here.


          When is it necessary to obtain a County Road Opening Permit?
Click here.


          Who do I call for snow removal on a county road?

In a snowbound police or medical emergency please call   9 1 1

Snow removal on a county road during a snow storm is performed in a planned, organized procedure by the Cape May County Road Department.  If a reasonable period of time has elapsed and you feel that you have not received attention, please call the Public Works Department at (609) 465-1035, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.



          Who do I call for trash collection?
For all trash collection please call the municipality in which you reside.  The municipal public works telephone numbers are listed for your convenience.
 
MUNICIPALITY                                 PUBLIC WORKS                  
Avalon 967-7697
Cape May 884-9570
Cape May Point 884-1454
Dennis Township 861-5309
Lower Township 884-0898
Middle Township 465-8745
North Wildwood 522-4646
Ocean City 525-9261  Extension 13
Sea Isle City 263-6988
Stone Harbor 368-7311
Upper Township 628-2647
West Cape May 884-2726
West Wildwood 522-4845
Wildwood 522-2942
Wildwood Crest 522-7446
Woodbine 861-2371


          Who do I call to report a pothole that needs filling on a county road?
If you would like to report a pothole that needs filling on a county road you can call the Cape May County Public Works Department at (609) 465-1035 between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.  If you would like to report the pothole via our website, click here  and choose "Pothole Reporter" as Request Type.

If you would like to report a pothole on a state highway in Cape May County, you can call (609) 428-6550 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday or (609) 530-2282 during non-business hours.


          Who do I contact for brush and/or grass cutting on a county road?
Brush and grass cutting on county roads is performed on regular basis when the season requires.  Should you feel that you have an area that has not been tended please call Cape May County Public Works at (609) 465-1035, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

If a situation occurs where a limb or debris falls into the county roadway causing a hazard and it is after hours or on a week end, please call (609) 886-1300 or (609) 365-4591


          Who do I contact to have a county road swept?
To place a request to have a county road swept please call Cape May County Public Works at (609) 465-1035, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.


          Who do I contact to remove a dead animal?
When this situation occurs on a county road you can call the Cape May County Public Works Department at (609) 465-1035, between the hours of  7:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.


          Who do I contact to report flooding on a county road?
To report flooding on a county road please call Cape May County Public Works at
(609) 465-1035, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

If you feel the flooding may cause a hazardous situation you can call after hours and on week ends, (609) 886-1300 or (609) 368-4591.


          Who do I contact when large vehicles vibrate my home because of utility digs?
When this problem occurs on a county road you can call the Cape May County Public Works Department at (609) 465-1035 between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.



 
Rutgers Cooperative Extension To Top
    Rutgers Cooperative Extension
          Where can I find a 4-H club and Youth Development programs?


          Where can I get information on parenting, human development, food safety, nutrition and personal finance?
The Family and Community Health Sciences department has extensive research-based resources on a number of topics in human development and nutrition. Contact us at (609) 465-5115.


          Where can I have a specific insect problem or plant disorder diagnosed?
Rutgers Cooperative Extension operates a Plant Diagnostic Laboratory at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.  Plant and insect samples can be sent directly to the laboratory for expert diagnosis by University staff.  A small fee applies to this service.

During the Spring of 2002, Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Cape May County will begin the "Cape May Master Gardener Program".  This Spring, local residents will be able to speak to trained Master Gardener volunteers about resource conservation and horticulture in Cape May.  Contact 609-465-5115 for information about becoming a "Cape May Master Gardener".


          Where can I obtain a soil test?
A soil test can be obtained through Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Cape May County; however, the actual analysis is performed at the Rutgers University Soil Testing Laboratory in New Brunswick, New Jersey.  Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Cape May County is located at 355 Courthouse/South Dennis Road, Cape May Court House, New Jersey. Contact 609-465-5115 for more information.


 
Sheriff's Office To Top
    Sheriff's Office
          Can I obtain a Department Patch?

Since the attack on 911 the Cape May County Sheriff's Office will NOT send department patches through the mail. Only requests made in person will be honored and only if the patches are available. We apologize for this, but feel it is important for security reasons. 

__________________________________________________________________________________


          What are the visiting hours for the Correctional Center?


Visiting hours for the Correctional Center are : 

As of June 15, 2009, inmate visiting at the Correctional Center has changed. Visitation is now by appointment only. Be sure to read the Rules and Instructions posted on the Correctional Center Visiting Page of the Cape May County Sheriff's Office Website at www.cmcsheriff.net

 

__________________________________________________________________________________


          What is the procedure for Employment with the Cape May County Sheriff's Office?

The two types of Law Enforcement positions available within the Sheriff's Office are Sheriff's Officer and Correctional Officer.

To be eligible for either position, you must first file a LAW ENFORCEMENT SERIES APPLICATION with the New Jersey Civil Service Commission to take the examination for these positions.

For more information please go to our
Employment Page.

_________________________________________________________________________________


          Who do I call to find out what a bail is for an inmate?

To find out the bail status or condition of release on any inmate that is currently incarcerated in the Cape May County Correctional Center, Call the Sheriff's Correctional Division Jail Records at (609) 465- 1240.
__________________________________________________________________________________


          What is the address to send a letter to an inmate?

You can send a letter to an inmate at the following address:

Cape May County Correctional Center
C/O Inmate (John Doe) # 4 Moore Road
Cape May Court House, NJ 08210

Please note this address is for sending an inmate letters only. Do not send cash, checks, stamps or pictures, etc. All mail is screened and these items will be removed and not forwarded to the inmate.

Money Orders for Commissary accounts will no longer be taken. Please see the new process for putting money into an inmates commissary account at the Cape May County Sheriff's website
www.cmcsheriff.net under the Correctional button. __________________________________________________________________________________


          (Law Enforcement Only) Procedure for background checks.

The Cape May County Sheriff's Office no longer does Police Background Checks by telephone, fax or email. All requests must be sent via US Postal Service with a return self addressed stamped envelope and a signed copy of the subjects records release form included. 
__________________________________________________________________________________



          How do I put money into an Inmate's Commissary account?

Depositing of money into an inmate's commissary account is done electronically.


In order to make a deposit you must know the inmate’s individual id number or his name. There are three methods to deposit money into an inmate’s commissary account:

  1. Online Website: - Go to the Cape May County Sheriff's Office web site at www.cmcsheriff.net and use the link provided under the Correctional/Commissary page. Follow the instructions provided. You may also go directly to the company's website at  www.inmatedeposits.com
  2. Call Center: - Call toll free number at 1-866-345-1884 and use any credit/debit card that has the Master Card or Visa Logo.
  3. Automatic Payment Processing Machine: -An ATM type machine is located at the Correctional Center that can accept payments using Master Card, Visa or cash.


 
Superintendent of Schools To Top
    Frequently Asked Questions About
          Special Education



~REFERRAL~ 

What is a referral?

A referral is a written request for an evaluation that is given to the school district when a child is suspected of having a disability and might need special education services.

Who can make a referral?

- Parents
- School Personnel
- Agencies concerned with the welfare of students

If you believe that your child may have a disability, you may refer your child for an evaluation by submitting a written request to your school district.  When writing to the school district about special education issues, you may write to the school principal, director of special education, child study team supervisor, case manager or other appropriate school official.

What happens when a referral is made?

Within 20 calendar days of receiving a referral, the school district must hold a meeting to decide whether an evaluation will be conducted.  If an evaluation will be conducted, another decision is made about the types of testing and other procedures that will be used to determine if your child needs special education services.


~DECISION-MAKING AND PARTICIPATION IN MEETINGS~

How are decisions made about my child's special education needs?

Decisions regarding your child's special education needs are made at meetings.  As the parent of a child who has or may have a disability, you have the right to participate in meetings regarding:

- Identification (decision to evaluate)
- Evaluation (nature and scope of assessment procedures);
- Classification (determination of whether your child is eligible for special education and   
   related services);
- Development and Review of your child's individualized education program (IEP);
-
Educational placement of your child; and 
Reevaluation of your child.

You are considered a member of the multi-disciplinary team of qualified persons who meet to make these determinations and develop your child's individualized education program (IEP).

You have the right to:

- Have an interpreter, translator or sign language interpreter provided by the school at no   
  cost to you, when necessary; and 
- Participate in required meetings through other means such as individual or conference 
  telephone calls if you cannot attend in person.
 

~NOTICE OF MEETING~
 
How will I be invited to participate in meetings?

To assure that you have the opportunity to participate in meetings and the decision-making process for your child, meetings about special education for your child must be scheduled at a time and place agreeable to you.  The school district must notify you in writing early enough to ensure that you will have an opportunity to attend.

What information must be included in the notice of a meeting?

The written notice of the meeting must state the purpose, time, location and who will be attending and:

- Inform you that you may invite to the meeting other individuals who have knowledge or  
 special expertise regarding your child, including related services personnel.  The   
 determination of whether the individual has such knowledge or special expertise is 
 determined by the party (you or the school district) who invited the individual;
- Beginning at age 14, or younger, if appropriate, the notice for a student with a disability 
 must also indicate that the purpose of the meeting will be the development of a  
 statement of the transition service needs, and that the school will invite the student to 
 attend the meeting; and 
-Beginning at age 16, or younger, if appropriate, the notice for a student with a disability 
 must also indicate that the purpose of a meeting is the consideration of needed transition 
 services and that the school will invite the student to attend the meeting.


~WRITTEN NOTICE~
  
How will I be informed of decisions regarding my child's special education needs?

Your school district will inform you of decisions being made about your child by giving you written notice.

Written notice must be given before the school district:

-Proposes to start or change:

   - The identification, evaluation and classification;
   - The implementation of an IEP or educational placement;
   - The provision of a free, appropriate public education (FAPE) to your child; and 
   - A reevaluation;

- Asks for consent; and
 
- Approves or denies a request
you have made in writing about the identification, 
  evaluation, educational placement or provision of a free, appropriate public education to 
  your child.


~NATIVE LANGUAGE AND WRITTEN NOTICE~

What does consent mean?

Consent means that you have been given all the information necessary to make an informed decision about the proposed activity.  Consent also means that you understand and agree in writing to the proposed activity.  Therefore, written notice must be part of any request for your written consent.

Consent is immediate.  This means, after you have given your written consent, the school district must start the activity as soon as possible.

When must the school district obtain my consent?

Your consent is required:

Before your child is evaluated for the first time to determine whether your child is 
  eligible for special education; 
- Before your child's special education program starts for the first time;
- Before your child is tested as part of a reevaluation.
  However, if the district can 
  show that it tried to get your consent for the reevaluation of your child and you did not 
   respond, then the district may proceed to evaluate without your consent; and 
- Before your child's records are released to a person or organization that is not
  otherwise authorized to see them.


~EVALUATION~

What is an evaluation?

An evaluation is the process used to determine whether your child has a disability.  This process incudes a review of any relevant data, and the individual administration of any tests, assessments and observations of your child.  For an initial evaluation, at least two child study team members and other specialists* as required or as determined necessary must participate.  (When the suspected disability is a language disorder, the speech-language specialist may participate as one of the two required child study team members.)

       * Specialists include but are not limited to speech-language specialists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and physicians.

When is an evaluation needed?

An evaluation is needed when you, the members of the child study team, and your child's teacher (to the extent appropriate) meet and decide that your child may have a disability.


~ELIGIBILITY~

How is eligibility determined?

When the evaluation is completed, eligibility is determined collaboratively at a meeting according to N.J.A.C. 6A:14-2.3(i) 1.  To be eligible for special education and related services:

- A student must have a disability according to one of the eligibility categories;
- The disability must adversely affect the student's educational performance; and 
- The student must be in need of special education and related services.

The school district must provide a copy of the evaluation report(s) and documentation of eligibility to the parent (or adult student, when applicable) when the written notice is provided.


~INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAM (IEP)~

What is an individualized education program?

After your child is determined to be eligible for special education and related services, a meeting will be held to develop your child's IEP.  The IEP is a written plan that describes in detail your child's special education program.  The IEP should describe how your child currently performs and your child's specific instructional needs.  The IEP must include measurable annual goals and short term objectives or benchmarks. 

Who must attend the IEP meeting?

- Student, it appropriate; 
- Parent;
- Regular education teacher (to the extent appropriate), if the student is or will be  
   participating in regular education;
- Special education teacher (or special education provider where appropriate); 
- At least one child study team member;
- Case manager; 
- School district representative;
- Others at the discretion of the parent or school district; and 
- If transition will be discussed at the IEP meeting, a representative of any other   
  agency likely to provide or pay for services.

You have the right to:

- Copies of your child's IEP;
- Bring others with you to the meetings;
- Tape record IEP meetings;
- Have the IEP implemented within 90 days of the school's receipt of your consent for the
  first evaluation; 
- Have the IEP implemented as soon as possible following an IEP meeting;
- Have the IEP reviewed at least annually; and 
- Have extended school year services considered.

What services are available to assist my child?

The type and amount of services available to your child are determined by the IEP team based on his or her individual needs.  These services may include:

- Specialized instruction in the regular classroom, in a resource program, or in a special
  education class; 
- Supplementary aids and services;
- Assistive technology; and
- Related services including but, not limited to, speech-language services, occupational
  therapy, physical therapy, counseling and transportation.


 
    General Questions
          Teacher Certification, etc...

Whom do I contact regarding Teacher Certification?

Leigh Ann Downie, of the County Superintendent's Office, can answer all your questions regarding certification.  She can be reached by calling (609) 465-1283.


Where can I get an application to become a Substitute Teacher? 

Substitute teacher packets can be obtained at your local district's board of education office.  If you have questions once you've obtained your packet, contact Tracey Scull of this office, at 465-1281.


I would like to get a job working for a school district.  Whom do I contact?

The Cape May County Superintendent of Schools Office does not hire employees to work in school districts.  If you are looking for a job in a school district, you must contact them directly.  Our office will gladly send you a public school directory which lists all of the schools in Cape May County along with their addresses and telephone numbers.  You can also go to our "Helpful Links" page and visit each school individually.


How do I get to the County Office from another area?

From the North (i.e. Atlantic City, Toms River, New Brunswick):
Take the Garden State Parkway South; make a left off of Garden State Parkway at Exit 11 (first traffic light) onto Crest Haven Road.  When through the intersection, make an immediate left onto Moore Road (runs parallel to Garden State Parkway).  The County Administration Building is at 4 Moore Road (one story brick building).  Enter parking lot and make a left.  The main entrance is in front of the flag pole.

From the Northwest (i.e. Cumberland County, Camden/Philadelphia):
Take Route 55 South to end (Becomes two-lane Route 47). Follow Route 47 to Route 347 (Bear left and follow main traffic flow at split).  Continue on 347; becomes Route 47 again (approximately 8 miles).  Make a left onto Route 83 South (use caution).  Continue on Route 83 to Route 9 South.  Make a right onto Route 9 South. Follow Route 9 South until traffic light at Crest Haven Road (you will see County Park/Zoo Entrance on right).  Make a left onto Crest Haven Road.  Follow Crest Haven Road through next light (you will cross the Garden State Parkway).  Once you are through the parkway intersection, make an immediate left onto Moore Road.  The County Administration Building is 4 Moore Road (one story brick building).  Enter parking lot and make a left.  The main entrance is in front of the flag pole.

From the South:
Take Garden State Parkway North to Exit 11.  Make a right at Exit 11 onto Crest Haven Road.  Make an immediate left onto Moore Road.  The County Administration Building is 4 Moore Road (one story brick building).  Enter parking lot and make a left.  The main entrance is in front of the flag pole. 
  


 
Surrogate To Top
    Surrogate
          Do all wills have to be probated?
No. Jointly held assets belong to the survivor and will pass to the survivor without the need for probate.  If no assets are in decedent's name alone, it may not be necessary to probate.


          Do my survivors have to pay inheritance tax?
There is no New Jersey Inheritance tax for surviving spouse, children, grandchildren, grandparents, adopted children and stepchildren.


          Does the State of New Jersey take my assets if I die without a will?
Not usually.  If you die with or without a Will, and have any next of kin, regardless of degree of kinship, the State of New Jersey does not receive your estate.


          How do I get started with an estate matter?
Please call the Surrogate's Office (609)463-6666, and we will take information and prepare the required documents for signature by the Executor or Administrator.  Certain information from the Will is required and it is helpful to have both the Will and death certificate at hand when you call.


          Is it expensive to probate a Will?
No.  The cost to probate a two-page Will is $100.00.


          Must I engage an attorney to probate a Will?
Usually, no; however, depending upon the value of the estate, the complexity of the assets, and if there may be a "contest" among the heirs, it is advisable to secure the advice of a New Jersey attorney.


          My grandmother wrote her last wishes on an envelope before she died. Is this considered a Will?
The determination as to the validity of that paper writing as a "will" can only be adjudicated by a judge of the Superior Court.  You will need the services of an  attorney to prepare the necessary pleadings and you must appear in Superior Court and give testimony relevant to that document and the handwriting.  If the judge of the Superior Court is satisfied with your testimony, he may authorize that paper writing to be admitted for probate, as a holographic will.


          What do I need to bring to the Surrogate Court to handle an estate?
We will require the original Will, certified death certificate, and a check or cash to pay the fee.  We cannot accept a "copy" of a Will; we must have the original document.


          What does "escheat" mean?
If you die intestate, with absolutely no next of kin, your net estate will then "escheat" to the State of New Jersey.


          What happens if I do not have a Will?
Depending upon the size of the estate, and the relationship to the decedent, administration may be granted for estates over $20,000 for a surviving spouse,  or an estate over $10,000 for a next of kin, other than a surviving spouse.  A general administrator is appointed and a bond may be required to guarantee proper handling of the administration.  Smaller estates are handled by Affidavit.


          Where should I keep my original Will?
First, only an "original Will" can be admitted to probate by the Surrogate Court.  Accordingly, the original Will should  be kept in a safe place, usually a safe deposit box in a bank or in a secure, fireproof box at home.  It is important that the Executor knows where you keep this original document.


 
Telephone Operations To Top
    General Questions
          Where can I get a list of county services and which department to contact?

We maintain a list of County Services organized by the title of the service. You can get  the list right here.



 
Veterans' Bureau To Top
    Veterans' Bureau
          Where do I file for Veterans' NJ property tax deduction?
To file for Veterans' NJ property tax deduction or exemption you must take a copy your discharge/DD Form 214 to the tax accessor in your town or city.  They have the proper form for completion.


 
Youth Services To Top
    Youth Services
          How do I contact you?
The Shelter is staffed 24 hours a day and can be contacted by calling 609-465-5045


 


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